Podcast - Why Our Teachers Are Turning to Sex Work

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2 Comments

wildlifezone's picture
wildlifezone

Funny, I just logged on to ask you to discuss this topic. I am an adjunct teacher, I have taught biology, environmental science, and ecology in the U.S. and Ecuador for Boston U, SDSU, and community colleges. I have 2 MS degrees, I have worked in the real world as a wildife biologist and env'l consultant for 25 years. I have  been an environmental activist practically my entire life and for that reason I especially love teaching environmental science because it is a topic that impacts everyone form every corner of the planet and it is something students can relate to no matter what theirmajor - after all we are talking nature, air, water, chemicals, energy, health, species, climate change - it's got everything. Every time I teach I have one to a handful of students tell me I changed their life. I wish that was enough payment, but it's not, and the worst part is I find myself saying what I swore I never would: they don't pay me enough to do that (insert time-intensive teaching strategy/grading/ assignment here). I have to work 2 - 3 jobs just to stay afloat, I certainly can't afford to pay my bills on an adjunct salary, and the rules keep us from teaching enough to be full time thus necessitating benefits that they don't want to pay. When I add all of the hours I work every week for teaching but am not paid for, my real world salary adds up to about $11/hour.

Meanwhile Ivy league professors get tenure, handsome salaries, security, and summers off, not to mention the automatic repsect and power such a position garners. I met USC professors living in huge trophy homes in L.A, yet their students told me they were medicore to horrible teachers, because they weren't trained or invested in teaching, just research. The system is broken, and the pay gap continues to widen as over 50% of professors are part time and paid terrilby with no benefits.I pride myself on my devotion to being a damned good teacher who has takne many classes onpedagogy, not just the subject matter, unlike my tenured peers who only require a PhD in any obscure subject to teach in that general field. But thanks to capitalism and undercutting, de-valuing of us teachers, I could make much better money as a plumber or Lyft driver than a teacher. It is a terribly depressing reality. I want to teach more, yet I have all but given it up because neither my time or passion is valued or compensatied.

wildlifezone's picture
wildlifezone

Funny, I just logged on to ask you to discuss this topic. I am an adjunct teacher, I have taught biology, environmental science, and ecology in the U.S. and Ecuador for Boston U, SDSU, and community colleges. I have 2 MS degrees, I have worked in the real world as a wildlife biologist and env'l consultant for 25 years. I have  been an environmental activist practically my entire life and for that reason I especially love teaching environmental science because it is a topic that impacts everyone from every corner of the planet and it is something students can relate to no matter what their major - after all we are talking nature, air, water, chemicals, energy, health, species, climate change - it's got everything. Every time I teach I have one to a handful of students tell me I changed their life. I wish that was enough payment, but it's not, and the worst part is I find myself saying what I swore I never would: they don't pay me enough to do that (insert time-intensive teaching strategy/grading/ assignment here). I have to work 2 - 3 jobs just to stay afloat, I certainly can't afford to pay my bills on an adjunct salary, and the rules keep us from teaching enough to be full time thus not necessitating benefits that they don't want to pay. When I add all of the hours I work every week for teaching but am not paid for, my real world salary adds up to about $11/hour.

Meanwhile Ivy league professors get tenure, handsome salaries, security, and summers off, not to mention the automatic respect and power such a position garners. I met USC professors living in huge trophy homes in L.A, yet their students told me they were mediocre to horrible teachers, because they weren't trained or invested in teaching, just research. The system is broken, and the pay gap continues to widen as over 50% of professors are part time and paid terribly with no benefits.I pride myself on my devotion to being a damned good teacher who has taken many classes on pedagogy, not just the subject matter, unlike my tenured peers who only require a PhD in any obscure subject to teach in that general field. But thanks to capitalism and undercutting, de-valuing of us teachers, I could make much better money as a plumber or Lyft driver than a teacher. It is a terribly depressing reality. I want to teach more, yet I have all but given it up because neither my time or passion is valued or compensated.

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